You are here

Study Publications


Your commitment and participation in research is impactful.

The decision to donate your time, health information, and/or biological samples has resulted in scientific publications which share important research findings with the greater breast cancer community. We are dedicated to keeping our members connected with research, from study launch through data analysis and results. To connect with results, we encourage you to view the following publications from previous Army of Women supported studies.

 


 

Read this article on the Neurobiology Of Aging website.

Publication Details
Kesler SR. Neurobiology Of Aging, September 2014

Study Information
Assessment and Treatment of Cognitive Deficits in Breast Cancer

This study at Stanford University is investigating the brain function problems associated with breast cancer and its treatment. The researchers were looking to enroll at least 180 volunteers. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on April 16, 2009. The researchers were able to close enrollment on May 4, 2009, after the Army of Women provided them with 1,341 women who were interested in enrolling in the study.

Read this article on the Oncology Nursing Forum website.

Publication Details
Brisbois MD. Oncology Nursing Forum, September 2014

Study Information
Chemotherapy-induced premature menopause in Latina Women with BC

This study at the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester is exploring the unique experiences and needs of Latina breast cancer survivors whose treatments have resulted in chemotherapy-induced menopause. The researchers wanted to enroll 20 volunteers. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on August 22, 2012. The researchers were able to close enrollment eight days later, on August 30, 2012, after the Army of Women provided them with 47 women who were interested in enrolling in the study.

Read this article on the Journal of Behavioral Medicine website.

Publication Details
Owen JE, Bantum EO, Criswell K, Bazzo J, Gorlick A, and Stanton AL Journal of Behavioral Medicine, August 2014

Study Information
Health-Space Study

This study at Loma Linda University, in California, is investigating the effect that a social-networking website that allows cancer patients to communicate, share information, and provide support to others over the Internet has on cancer-related distress. The researchers wanted to enroll at least 120 women and men who had been diagnosed with breast cancer. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on August 24, 2011. The researchers were able to close enrollment on August 25, 2011, after the Army of Women provided them with 380 people who were interested in enrolling in the study

Read this article on the Psychooncology website.

Publication Details
Lyn W. Freeman, PhD,1,* Rebecca White, MD,2 Chelsea G. Ratcliff, MA,3 Sue Sutton, BS,1 Mary Stewart, MD,4 J. Lynn Palmer, PhD,5 Judith Link, RN,6 and Lorenzo Cohen, PhD7 Psychooncology, August 2014

Study Information
Envision the Rhythms of Life Study

This study by a research group in Seattle, Washington, is investigating whether a classroom-based, mind-body imagery program can help to improve the quality of life of breast cancer survivors. The researchers were looking to enroll at least 75 volunteers. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on January 21, 2010. The researchers were able to close enrollment on February 15, 2010, after the Army of Women provided them with 77 women who were interested in enrolling in the study.

Read this article on the JAMA Internal Medicine website.

Publication Details
Joffe H, Guthrie KA, LaCroix AZ, Reed SD, Ensrud KE, Manson JE, Newton KM, Freeman EW, Anderson GL, Larson JC, Hunt J, Shifren J, Rexrode KM, Caan B, Sternfeld B, Carpenter JS, Cohen L. JAMA Internal Medicine, July 2014

Study Information
Comparison of Venlafaxine-XR and Low-Dose Estradiol for Treatment of Menopausal Symptoms

The research team is studying two medicines that may help to reduce hot flashes. One is a low dose estrogen pill; the other is a serotonin-based pill called venlafaxine (brand name Effexor XR). The researchers want to know if women who take these medicines have fewer or less severe hot flashes than women who take a placebo (inactive pill). They also want to determine if one medicine is more effective than the other. A total of 304 women will be participating in this study across the United States at three research sites: Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston; Group Health Research Institute, in Seattle; and University of Pennsylvania, Department of Obstetrics/Gynecology, Philadelphia. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on March 28, 2012. When the researchers closed enrollment on May 15, 2012, the Army of Women had provided them with 117 women who were interested in enrolling in the study.

Read this article on the Sleep website.

Publication Details
Palesh, O., Aldridge-Gerry A., Zeitzer J. M., Koopman C., Neri E., Giese-Davis J., Jo B., Kraemer H., Nouriani B. and Spiegel D. Sleep, May 2014

Study Information
Stress and Breast Cancer Study

This study at Stanford University, in Calif., is investigating the relationships between psychological factors such as stress, quality of sleep, hormones, immunity, and cancer progression. The researchers wanted to enroll at least 125 volunteers. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on September 2, 2009. The researchers were able to close enrollment on April 11, 2011, after the Army of Women provided them with 363 women who were interested in enrolling in the study.

Read this article on the Psychoneuroendocrinology website.

Publication Details
Bower JE, Greendale G, Crosswell AD, Garet D, Sternlieb B, Ganz PA, Irwin MR, Olmstead R, Arevalo J, Cole SW. Psychoneuroendocrinology, May 2014

Study Information
Yoga and Wellness Program for Breast Cancer Survivors Study

This study at the University of California, Los Angeles, is comparing the effects that yoga and a Wellness Seminar series have on breast cancer survivors’ energy, mood, physical function, and immune and endocrine systems. The researchers were looking to enroll at least 60 volunteers. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on October 21, 2009. The researchers were able to close enrollment on February 3, 2010, after the Army of Women provided them with 42 women who were interested in enrolling in the study.

Read this article on the Psychooncology website.

Publication Details
Gorlick A, Bantum EO, Owen JE. Psychooncology, April 2014

Study Information
Health-Space Study

This study at Loma Linda University, in California, is investigating the effect that a social-networking website that allows cancer patients to communicate, share information, and provide support to others over the Internet has on cancer-related distress. The researchers wanted to enroll at least 120 women and men who had been diagnosed with breast cancer. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on August 24, 2011. The researchers were able to close enrollment on August 25, 2011, after the Army of Women provided them with 380 people who were interested in enrolling in the study

Read this article on the Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society website.

Publication Details
Hosseini SM, Kesler SR. Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society, April 2014

Study Information
Assessment and Treatment of Cognitive Deficits in Breast Cancer

This study at Stanford University is investigating the brain function problems associated with breast cancer and its treatment. The researchers were looking to enroll at least 180 volunteers. The Call to Action for this study was sent to Army of Women members on April 16, 2009. The researchers were able to close enrollment on May 4, 2009, after the Army of Women provided them with 1,341 women who were interested in enrolling in the study.

Read this article on the Journal of Clinical Oncology website.

Publication Details
Kiecolt-Glaser J.K., Bennett J.M., Andridge R., Peng J., Shapiro C.L., Malarkey W.B., Emery C.F., Layman R., Mrozek E.E., and Glaser R. Journal of Clinical Oncology, April 2014

Study Information
Yoga for Breast Cancer Survivors: Effects on Fatigue, Immune Function, and Mood

Breast cancer survivors can have a lot of post-treatment problems, such as fatigue, depression, and a decrease in physical function. It is possible that physical activities, like yoga, could help ease these symptoms. This study wanted to learn how yoga affects fatigue, immune function, and mood of women treated for breast cancer. The researchers wanted to enroll up to 250 volunteers from the Army of Women (AOW) from Columbus, OH. The Call to Action for this study was sent to AOW members on February 23, 2009. The researchers closed enrollment on June 18th, 2009, after the AOW provided them with 23 women who were interested in enrolling in the study.

Pages