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Current Projects

 
  
 
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The following projects are currently open and enrolling volunteers. These studies were evaluated and approved by the research team at Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation and members of our external Scientific Advisory Committee, comprised of researchers, clinicians, and advocates.

If you would like to learn about the studies we recruited for in the past, please click here.

  
Researcher: Ann Marie Flores, PT, PhD, CLT, Northwestern University
Broadcast date: September 27, 2017

The purpose of this study is to learn more about what breast cancer survivors age 65 and older know about the physical and functional impairments related to their breast cancer and its treatment. It will also help the research team understand what can be done to help people recover from breast cancer. This study is seeking 50 breast cancer survivors and 50 healthcare providers for a one-time, one-hour phone interview.

Researcher: Alexandra Zimmer, M.D., at the National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
Broadcast date: September 20, 2017

The purpose of this study is to investigate whether using Temodar and Kadcyla together decreases the chance of patients with HER2+ metastatic breast cancer developing new brain metastases. Approximately 18 participants will take part in this study. Participants enrolled in this trial may be eligible to receive compensation for their travel expenses.

Researcher: Carolyn Westhoff, MD, Columbia University, New York, NY
Broadcast date: August 9, 2017

The purpose of this study is to learn how two different medications affect the breast: an estrogen-free selective progesterone-receptor modulator called UPA vs. a low-dose oral contraceptive pill. This is a randomized, phase I clinical trial. Participants have a 50% chance of receiving the UPA pill, and 50% chance of receiving the low-dose oral contraceptive.

Researcher: Thomas Mack, MD, MPH, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Broadcast date: July 12, 2017

This study aims to identify non-genetic factors that cause only one twin in a pair to get breast cancer. This information could help researchers identify ways to help prevent breast cancer from occurring.

Researcher: David Spiegel, MD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA
Broadcast date: June 7, 2017

The goal of this study is to better understand what women are thinking about and feeling as they decide on their cancer treatments. The results of this study may help researchers develop new interventions that may better assist women newly diagnosed with breast cancer with their treatment decisions.

Researcher: Patricia A. Ganz, MD, Julienne Bower, PhD, and Catherine Crespi, PhD at University of California: Los Angeles; Ann Partridge, MD, MPH and Hadine Jaffe, MD, MSc at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute; and Antonio Wolff, MD, Katherine Smith, PhD, and Elissa Bantug, MHS at Johns Hopkins University
Broadcast date: May 3, 2017

The purpose of this study is to see how well two different types of group programs—mindfulness-meditation classes and survivorship education classes—meet the needs of young survivors. Up to 360 women will take part in this study. Three institutions are collaborating on this project: University of California, Los Angeles, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Johns Hopkins University

Researcher: Christine Miaskowski, PhD, RN, University of California, San Francisco
Broadcast date: April 25, 2017

This study is designed to identify both signs and symptoms of breast cancer-related lymphedema and genetic factors that predict whether patients are at increased risk for developing lymphedema. The researchers intend to use the results to develop and test new approaches to prevent or reduce the risk of lymphedema developing following breast cancer treatment.

Researcher: Steven Narod, MD, Women's College Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Broadcast date: March 15, 2017

Genetic and non-genetic factors are believed to influence whether a woman with a BRCA1, BRCA2, and/or PALB2 mutation goes on to develop breast and/or ovarian cancer. The study is trying to identify which hormonal, reproductive, and lifestyle factors may increase cancer risk in this high-risk group.

Researcher: Janice Kiecolt-Glaser, Ph.D., The Ohio State University Institute, Columbus, OH
Broadcast date: September 7, 2016

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between your cardiovascular fitness and your body’s immune response, as both may be related to fatigue (tiredness), mood, pain sensitivity, memory, and concentration—known side effects of cancer and its treatments. By learning if people with better cardiovascular fitness have lower inflammation, researchers will be able to discover whether and how regular exercise benefits breast cancer survivors.

Researcher: Heather Greenlee, ND, PhD, Columbia University, New York
Broadcast date: June 1, 2016

The purpose of this study is to test the effectiveness of Mi Vida Saludable (My Healthy Life), a program designed to help Latina/Hispanic breast cancer survivors eat a healthy diet and be physically active. The Mi Vida Saludable program includes four weeks of hands-on and in-person nutrition and physical activity education classes and 11 months of electronic communication via text messaging, emails, and a website. Participants will track their physical activity with a Fitbit Zip, which they keep at the end of the study.

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