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Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation

Congratulations DSLRF Research Team!

Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation would like to extend heartfelt congratulations to Leah Eshraghi and Amaka Obidegwu, who were recently promoted to research director and research project manager, respectively. I am thrilled to be starting my new role as DSLRF's director of clinical research. Having worked at DSLRF since March 2010, I am ready for new challenges and responsibilities. My previous position entailed managing our Army of Women program®, which was very rewarding in many ways.

Research Worth Watching: the Precision Medicine Project

Usually I use this space to tell you about some new molecular finding that changes the way we think about breast cancer. But after two trips to the East Coast this month to talk about the President's Precision Medicine Project, I thought I should bring you up to date on what this is and what it might mean for all of us. The basic concept of precision medicine is that our current ability to map a person's genome, as well as the mutations in their cancer or related to another disease, gives us a new opportunity to figure out how to precisely treat a disease.

A Letter From the CEO

Dear Friends, Several months ago, the Board of Directors of Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation embarked on a strategic planning process to create a three- to five-year plan. We engaged a professional consulting team, who conducted an 'environmental scan' by holding interviews and focus groups, and surveyed some of our key constituent groups, including Army of Women® members and advocates. If you are one of the several hundred people who completed the survey, thank you! If this is the first time you're hearing about this, please don't feel left out.

PROMPT Genetics Registry Needs You!

PROMPT was created by cancer researchers at Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Mayo Clinic, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and the University of Pennsylvania.   The mission of PROMPT is simple to create a way for participants to provide critical information to help promote scientific discoveries related to cancer susceptibility genes.  By taking part in PROMPT, participants can also learn more about how genetic alterations in certain genes may affect their health and cancer risk, while helping researchers to better understand these risks.

CVO Report: ASCO 2015

If it's the end of May it must be time for ASCO! What's ASCO, you ask? It is the American Association of Clinical Oncology annual meeting that is held in Chicago around this time of the year. Although the association is a professional organization based in the U.S., their annual meeting, which attracts more than 30,000 people, includes cancer docs hailing from more than 100 countries across the world.

Thank You for Walking with Love

We are so pleased to announce that Walk with Love this past Sunday was a HUGE success. More than 750 people came ouIMG_0080t to walk or run with their families and friends along with many loving dogs. We hope you all enjoyed the day as much as we did! Thanks to YOU we raised almost $225,000! However, it is not too late to help Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation reach that $250,000 goal.

A Letter From the CEO

Dear Friends, Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation is, as you likely know by now, dedicated to a future without breast cancer. For us, that means conducting research into the cause of breast cancer so we can learn how to stop it before it starts. This isn't a popular area of research. Cure is much sexier. Cure means you're fixing people and that makes you a savior. But 'cure' also means treating cancer after it's formed and found. We feel the price of treating cancer is simply too high.

Warriors in Pink Launch The Good Day Project

Those living with breast cancer have good days and bad days but Dr. Susan Love Research Foundation's partner Warriors in Pink is looking to help give them more good days than bad. A collaboration between Warriors in Pink, their charity partners, Lyft and Meal Train, The Good Day Project aims to make the day-to-day lives of those battling the disease a little easier.

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